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Patmore, Coventry. Listings

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1 Patmore, Coventry. Autograph Letter, Signed.

Dated The Lodge, Lymington, Hants, February 18, 1892. To James John Garth Wilkinson, "It would give me great pleasure to renew our acquaintance of former years....we live on the verge of the New Forest, in the most lovely country....we have a large old house with lots of spare rooms. I send with this a little book (not present) of mine, which may amuse you." Wilkinson (1812-1899) is known for his translations of several of Swedenborg's scientific works. He was a great friend of Henry James, Sr., and “his literary friends and acquaintances included Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, (and) Coventry Patmore..." (Richard Lines, A History of the Swedenborg Society, 1810-2010, 2012, p. 78). According to Lines, "His (Patmore's) The Angel in the House….hugely admired at the time (v.1, 1854; v.2, 1856)….was "clearly influenced by Swedenborg's Conjugal Love" (p. 178). Though Patmore was interested in Swedenborg, he was an Anglican who converted to Catholicism in 1864. Two conjugate leaves, two pp., Fine, in the original mailing envelope, a little dirty. 
Price: 175.00 USD
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2 Patmore, Coventry. Autograph Letter, Signed.

No date, no place, to "Dear Sir", arranging for manuscripts of poems to be sent to "Miss Procter", who will "omit the Catholic Poems & select from the others." This was likely the poet Adelaide Anne Procter (1825-1864), daughter of Bryan Waller Procter (Barry Cornwall). One small sheet, 10 lines, pasted to a slightly larger piece of paper, cut from an album leaf. A little staining from glue, Very Good. 
Price: 125.00 USD
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3 [Emerson, Ralph Waldo; Coventry Patmore] Reviews of Emerson's "English Traits" and Patmores's "The Angel in the House; The Espousals" in "The Ladies' Repository"

for September, 1856. Boston: A. Tompkins, 1856. Original printed wrappers, v.25, no.3. Brief reviews, "English Traits" is Emerson's best book, largely because it is the most intelligible, and "The Espousals" is not as good as the first volume of "Angel in the House", "The Betrothal". The reviewer fails to mention this poem is anonymous - perhaps feeling that his audience would know this because it was very popular in America and there was a great deal of guessing at the identity of the author. Very little wear, a damp-stain to the top of the front wrapper; a Very Good copy. 
Price: 32.50 USD
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4 Patmore, Coventry. The Angel in the House.

In Two Volumes. London: Macmillan (titles are cancels), 1863. Uniformly bound in Original green cloth, gilt lettered, ruled in gilt and blind, with the "Macmillan&Co. / 1863" in gilt at the bottom of each spine. These were originally published by John W. Parker - these are the Parker sheets with Macmillan titles, a half-title, and dedication leaf inserted. Colbeck, quoting Macmillan’s Bibliographic Catalogue, 1891, notes that Parker sent “copies of parts” to Macmillan in May, 1863. (Colbeck, v.2, p.643). Macmillan’s Bibliographic Catalogue (p.106) asserts that Macmillan did not produce its own electrotype plates until 1865. Volume 1 contains "The Betrothal" and "The Espousals"; volume 2 contains "Faithful Forever" and "The Victories of Love" . The Betrothal and The Espousals were published anonymously in 1854 and 1856; Faithful Forever and Victories of Love came out with attribution in 1860 and 1863, respectively, Inspired by the author's wife, Emily, The Angel in the House celebrated in verse the ideal woman, her marriage, and domestic happiness. Ralph Waldo Emerson gave a copy of The Espousals to his brother's wife, Susan (Mrs. William Emerson), in 1856. When he learned that his friend Patmore was the author, he wrote to him (May 5, 1856): "I think there never was so sudden a public formed for itself by any poem as fast as here exists for ‘the Angel in the House’..….I give you joy and thanks as the maker of this beautiful poem….". There were good contemporary reviews and many reprints, but posterity has been unkind to Patmore. Perhaps unfairly, succeeding generations would hold up the "The Angel" as an example of the oppressed Victorian woman, victimized by her paternalistic society. Virginia Woolf read a paper to the Women’s Service League in 1931, asserting that “Killing the ‘Angel in the House’ is part of the occupation of a woman writer…..She sacrificed herself daily. If there was chicken, she took the leg. If there was a draught, she sat in it….she never had a mind or a wish of her own.” (“Professions for Women”, not printed until The Death of the Moth, 1942). Patmore's "Angel" has been the subject of many recent gender studies. Light rubbing at spine ends. Volume 2 entirely unopened. Lightly rubbed at the top, a little frayed at the bottoms of the spines. In v.1 a chip out of the front free endpaper, rear endpapers beginning to crack. A Very Good copy 
Price: 80.00 USD
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5 Patmore, Coventry. The Angel in the House.

In Two Volumes. Volume 1: London: John W. Parker (title conjugate), 1860; volume 2: London: Macmillan (title a cancel) 1863. Uniformly bound in Original green cloth, gilt lettered, ruled in gilt and blind, with the Macmillan imprint at the bottom of each spine. Colbeck, quoting Macmillan’s Bibliographic Catalogue, 1891, notes that Parker sent “copies of parts” to Macmillan in May, 1863, but he didn’t have v.1 with the Parker imprint, as here, but with a Macmillan imprint – a cancel. (Colbeck, v.2, p.643). Macmillan’s Bibliographic Catalogue (p.106) asserts that Macmillan did not produce its own electrotype plates until 1865. Volume 1 contains "The Betrothal" and "The Espousals"; volume 2 contains "Faithful Forever" and "The Victories of Love" . The Betrothal and The Espousals were published anonymously in 1854 and 1856; Faithful Forever and Victories of Love came out with attribution in 1860 and 1863, respectively, Inspired by the author's wife, Emily, The Angel in the House celebrated in verse the ideal woman, her marriage, and domestic happiness. Ralph Waldo Emerson gave a copy of The Espousals to his brother's wife, Susan (Mrs. William Emerson), in 1856. When he learned that his friend Patmore was the author, he wrote to him (May 5, 1856): "I think there never was so sudden a public formed for itself by any poem as fast as here exists for ‘the Angel in the House’..….I give you joy and thanks as the maker of this beautiful poem….". There were good contemporary reviews and many reprints, but posterity has been unkind to Patmore. Perhaps unfairly, succeeding generations would hold up the "The Angel" as an example of the oppressed Victorian woman, victimized by her paternalistic society. Virginia Woolf read a paper to the Women’s Service League in 1931, asserting that “Killing the ‘Angel in the House’ is part of the occupation of a woman writer…..She sacrificed herself daily. If there was chicken, she took the leg. If there was a draught, she sat in it….she never had a mind or a wish of her own.” (“Professions for Women”, not printed until The Death of the Moth, 1942). Patmore's "Angel" has been the subject of many recent gender studies. Light rubbing at spine ends. Volume 2 entirely unopened. A Fine copy. 
Price: 135.00 USD
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6 Patmore, Coventry. The Angel in the House.

In Two Volumes. Volume 1: London: John W. Parker (title conjugate), 1860; volume 2: London: Macmillan (title a cancel) 1863. Uniformly bound in Original green cloth, gilt lettered, ruled in gilt and blind, with the Macmillan imprint at the bottom of each spine. Colbeck, quoting Macmillan’s Bibliographic Catalogue, 1891, notes that Parker sent “copies of parts” to Macmillan in May, 1863, but he didn’t have v.1 with the Parker imprint, as here, but with a Macmillan imprint – a cancel. (Colbeck, v.2, p.643). Macmillan’s Bibliographic Catalogue (p.106) asserts that Macmillan did not produce its own electrotype plates until 1865. A presentation copy: "Miss Kate Robson with the Authors kind Regards, March 7th, 1873". Volume 1 contains "The Betrothal" and "The Espousals"; volume 2 contains "Faithful Forever" and "The Victories of Love" . The Betrothal and The Espousals were published anonymously in 1854 and 1856; Faithful Forever and Victories of Love came out with attribution in 1860 and 1863, respectively, Inspired by the author's wife, Emily, The Angel in the House celebrated in verse the ideal woman, her marriage, and domestic happiness. Ralph Waldo Emerson gave a copy of The Espousals to his brother's wife, Susan (Mrs. William Emerson), in 1856. When he learned that his friend Patmore was the author, he wrote to him (May 5, 1856): "I think there never was so sudden a public formed for itself by any poem as fast as here exists for ‘the Angel in the House’..….I give you joy and thanks as the maker of this beautiful poem….". There were good contemporary reviews and many reprints, but posterity has been unkind to Patmore. Perhaps unfairly, succeeding generations would hold up the "The Angel" as an example of the oppressed Victorian woman, victimized by her paternalistic society. Virginia Woolf read a paper to the Women’s Service League in 1931, asserting that “Killing the ‘Angel in the House’ is part of the occupation of a woman writer…..She sacrificed herself daily. If there was chicken, she took the leg. If there was a draught, she sat in it….she never had a mind or a wish of her own.” (“Professions for Women”, not printed until The Death of the Moth, 1942). Patmore's "Angel" has been the subject of many recent gender studies. Emily died in 1860, and Patmore married twice more. In 1881 he married his third wife, Harriet Robson, governess to his children, who must have been related to the Miss Kate Robson who received the present volumes from the author in 1873. Light wear and soil, moderate cloth bubbling. A Very Good copy. 
Price: 675.00 USD
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7 Patmore, Coventry. The Victories of Love.

London and Cambridge: Macmillan, 1863. First English edition, there was an American edition in 1862 (NCBEL v.3, 487). Contemporary half-morocco and marbled paper boards, modern leather label, gilt. A family copy, this belonged to Patmore's youngest son, Henry John (born 1860), from his first wife, Emily, signed on the title "Harry Patmore". This is the last volume in Patmore's tetralogy on love and marriage, "The Angel in the House", which was "lavished with sincere praise...(by)....Tennyson, Browning, Ruskin and Carlyle". Harry died young, at 23, but was himself "a charming lyrical poet....a selection of his poems was privately printed..." (Richard Garnett in DNB). Re-backed with matching leather, wear to corners. A Very Good copy. 
Price: 225.00 USD
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